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Publication Quality + Evaluation

Author-Level Evaluation

There are several sites and databases that provide metrics at the author level. Some of these use the same kind of metrics (like h-index); the numbers may vary, however, because the sites examine different articles or journals. 

  •  What can you learn from an author-level analysis?
    • This is an average measure of the author's citations according to the one site.
  •  What tools can you use for author-level analyses?
    • Web of Science, Scopus, Publish or Perish, Google Scholar
  •  Can an author improve their author-level metrics?
    • Yes, ORCID Scopus ID, Researcher ID. Claiming Google Scholar profile.

Web of Science

 

On the homepage, select Author Search. Search by last name only, or full name - the database will provide suggestions. 

Once a name is searched, the database will take you to the author page. From here, select to view the Full Citation Report.

This is the total number of articles written by the author indexed in Web of Science. This may or may not be a comprehensive list of all articles written by the author, and can cause skewed metrics. In disciplines or with researchers who publish in journals which are not mostly indexed in Web of Science, the accompanying author metrics will not be completely accurate because they cannot take into account the totality of an author's published articles.

Introduced by Dr. Jorge Hirsch at The University of California, San Diego, h-index is the highest number h where the journal has published h articles that have been cited h times.

  • So if a journal puts out 50 articles that have each been cited 50 times, its h-index is 50. 
  • If it put out 50 articles that are each cited 5 times, its h-index is 5.
  • If it put out 8 articles that are each cited 50 times, its h-index is 8.

Since different sites track different subsets of journals, a journal's h-index will be different depending on the site used.

This is the number of total documents by the author housed in Web of Science divided by the number of sum of times cited.

Average Citation per Item = (Total Documents/Sum of Times Cited)

This number is total number of times an author has been cited that is indexed in Web of Science.

The number varies from Citing Articles - it looks at citations and how many times an author has been cited overall as opposed to the articles and documents themselves themselves.

This number is total number of times an author has been cited by authors other than themselves that has been indexed in Web of Science.

The number varies from Citing Articles (without Self Citations) - it looks at citations and how many times an author has been cited by authors other than themselves as opposed to the articles and documents themselves.

This is the total number of documents written who have cited this author.

The number varies from Sum of Times Cited - it looks at articles and other documents as opposed to the citations themselves.

This is the total number of documents written by authors other than themselves who have cited this author.

The number varies from Sum of Times Cited (without Self Citations) - it looks at articles written by authors other than themselves  and other documents as opposed to the citations themselves.

Scopus

Access the Scopus Preview Home Page.

Delivering a comprehensive overview of the world’s research output in the fields of science, technology, medicine social sciences and arts and humanities, Scopus features smart tools to track, analyze and visualize research.

 

To view author metrics, click on the option view the author profile.

You can search by name, affiliated university or ORCID .

This is the total amount of documents examined by the author in Scopus. This is limited, however, to articles indexed in Scopus, which may or may not include all articles written by the author. Because of this, the number could be smaller than the number of articles actually written by the author.

This is the number of documents that have cited the author. This is different than the number of times it was cited, as one document could cite the same author multiple times in one document. Because of this, the number of citing documents could be smaller than the number of times cited.

Introduced by Dr. Jorge Hirsch at The University of California, San Diego, h-index is the highest number h where the author has published h articles that have been cited h times.

  • So if an author puts out 50 articles that have each been cited 50 times, their h-index is 50. 
  • If they put out 50 articles that are each cited 5 times, their h-index is 5.
  • If they put out 8 articles that are each cited 50 times, their h-index is 8.

Since different sites track different subsets of journals and articles, an author's h-index will be different depending on the site used.

Google Scholar

Access the Google Scholar Homepage.

Google Scholar Metrics provide an easy way for authors to quickly gauge the visibility and influence of recent articles in scholarly publications. Scholar Metrics summarize recent citations to many publications, to help authors as they consider where to publish their new research.

Type in the name of the author: Last name, First Name. You can include a middle name or initial to help differentiate between authors with the same or similar names. Click Search.

 

On the results page, if there is a page linked to the author, you will see the name underlined. Click on it to access the author page.

This is the number of time the author has been cited by other authors. It looks at all publications indexed in Google Scholar, regardless of how many years the publications span.

This is the number of time the author has been cited by other authors in the last five years

Introduced by Dr. Jorge Hirsch at The University of California, San Diego, h-index is the highest number h where the author has published h articles that have been cited h times.

  • So if an author puts out 50 articles that have each been cited 50 times, their h-index is 50. 
  • If they put out 50 articles that are each cited 5 times, their h-index is 5.
  • If they put out 8 articles that are each cited 50 times, their h-index is 8.

Since different sites track different subsets of journals and articles, an author's h-index will be different depending on the site used. This metric looks at the h-index for all publications indexed in Google Scholar, regardless of how many years the publications span.

 

Introduced by Dr. Jorge Hirsch at The University of California, San Diego, h-index is the highest number h where the author has published h articles that have been cited h times.

  • So if an author puts out 50 articles that have each been cited 50 times, their h-index is 50. 
  • If they put out 50 articles that are each cited 5 times, their h-index is 5.
  • If they put out 8 articles that are each cited 50 times, their h-index is 8.

Since different sites track different subsets of journals and articles, an author's h-index will be different depending on the site used. This metric looks at the h-index for publications indexed in Google Scholar in the last five years.

The i10-index is a metric only used by Google Scholar. This is the number of all publications with at least 10 citations, regardless of how many years the publications span.

The i10-index is a metric only used by Google Scholar. This is the number of publications with at least 10 citations from the last five years.

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